Ontario scraps idea to take traffic ticket system out of the courts

Ontario scraps idea to take traffic ticket system out of the courts

Original article published by the Toronto Star http://barrie.ctvnews.ca/ontario-scraps-idea-to-take-traffic-ticket-system-out-of-the-courts-1.2882485

Allison Jones, The Canadian Press
Published Sunday, May 1, 2016 10:03AM EDT

The province has decided against implementing Administrative Monetary Penalty (AMP) at this time.  While this has generally flown under the public radar, there was a large push to change the way that traffic tickets are being contested in Ontario.  The idea was that minor traffic tickets would be dealt with in a way that would not mimic the criminal system, but more of a civil system that simply dealt with the fines.  Naturally, the problem with this was that aspects of the conviction, like demerit points and your insurance rates going up, would not be reduced at all.

Beyond this, people would be losing their right to actually contest these tickets.  You would be assumed guilty, and be able to argue the fine amount, but the avenue to actually have your say in court would be eliminated.  We experience calls from people everyday that are very adamant that they did not commit the offence they were accused of.  This is often for minor offences, like speeding or cell phone violations.  Under the AMP system, these individuals would not be able to present their position in court.

Fortunately, thanks to the efforts of groups, like the Ontario Paralegal Association (who we are a part of) and individuals who were vocally against the AMP system, the change has been taken off the table.  While the Attorney General will continue to explore other avenues and changes, this movement has been set aside for the time being.

This is great news for anyone who has, or who will ever, fight a traffic ticket, and ensures that we maintain our right to a face our accuser and present our case at court.

Is it worth it to fight my speeding ticket in court?

Is it worth it to fight my speeding ticket in court?

Original Article Published by The Globe and Mail – http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-drive/culture/commuting/is-it-worth-it-to-fight-my-speeding-ticket-in-court/article23970625/

Inconsistent radar testing casts doubt on validity of millions of speeding tickets

Inconsistent radar testing casts doubt on validity of millions of speeding tickets

Article Published by CBC.ca – http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/speeding-tickets-police-radar-testing-1.3415927

Original Article Written by Marnie Luke, Lori Ward, CBC News

Ticket Shield has had a number of clients calling in making reference to this article.  It is certainly insightful and something to think about.  The article discusses the protocol and techniques used to test and calibrate speed radar equipment.  Equipment testing is an avenue of defence that we consider frequently and can lead to charges being withdrawn.

The most common form of testing is using “tuning forks”, which are two-pronged metal devices that will vibrate when tapped against something.  The officers can place the fork in front of the radar gun to ensure it is taking a reading correctly. Police Officers are required to provide proof of testing/calibration in order to convict someone of speeding at trial.  It is suggested that often times the officers are not actually using the tuning forks or they are testing the equipment improperly.  The article also discusses the use of laser radar, which does not require tuning forks to calibrate.

The implication is that there are flaws with the way that speeding tickets are being issued and there is potential that many of the officers are not properly testing their equipment.  Rest assured – this is something that we always investigate and have had speeding tickets dropped on numerous occasions for raising issues relating to testing times and calibration logs for speed detection devices.

Check out the original article.

Prepare yourself for battle to fight a ticket

 
Original Source: http://www.thestar.com/business/2015/01/30/prepare-yourself-for-battle-to-fight-a-ticket-roseman.html

Ontario to put increased fines for distracted driving back on table

Ontario to put increased fines for distracted driving back on table

Original Article:

ABDUL LATHEEF

The Canadian Press

Drivers in Ontario could soon face much stiffer

Link to Original Article: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-drive/news/industry-news/ontario-to-put-increased-fines-for-distracted-driving-back-on-table/article20211354/

Police to issue heftier tickets for rush hour parking

Police to issue heftier tickets for rush hour parking

Downtown rush hour parking violators will be fined $150, up from the $60 penalty.

Original Article published by the Toronto Star.  Written By:  Transportation reporter, Published on Tue Jan 21 2014

The article discusses the increased fine amounts of parking tickets in Toronto.  The city claims that it is more about compliance than revenue.  This appears to be an  attempt to crack down on individuals who fragrantly disobey the parking laws and either ignore or collect the tickets to pay off years later.

Link to original article: http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2014/01/21/police_set_to_issue_new_higher_tickets_starting_thursday_at_midnight.html

Cellphone law: Holding one even briefly while driving is illegal, Ontario court rules

Cellphone law: Holding one even briefly while driving is illegal, Ontario court rules

Check out the article.

  1. www.ontariocourts.ca/decisions/2013/2013onca0585.htm
  2. www.ontariocourts.ca/decisions/2013/2013onca0584.htm
  3. www.thestar.com/business/tech_news/2013/09/26/rogers_and_sprint_to_offer_highspeed_wifi_in_cars.html

All rights to the original article belong to www.thestar.com – http://www.thestar.com/news/crime/2013/09/27/its_illegal_to_even_hold_a_cellphone_while_driving_court_rules.html

Ontario considering demerit points for distracted drivers

Source: Ontario considering demerit points for distracted drivers | CTV London News.

In this CTV London article, the possibility of having the distracted driving laws made more strict.  Transportation Minister Glen Murray said, “There will be action coming, whether it’s regulations, whether it’s legislation or some combination of education and new penalties — haven’t decided. We’re really in the middle of looking at what would be most effective.”

They note that 235,000 of these charges have been laid over the last 3 years.  20% of which are relating to a collision.  The stricter laws would include an increased fine from $100 to $400, and 3 demerit points.

Please check out the article.